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General Category => Modellers At Work => Topic started by: granitechops on November 16, 2010, 04:37:24 AM



Title: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 16, 2010, 04:37:24 AM
In line with my change of direction thread

http://www.finescalerr.com/smf/index.php?topic=1183.0

I was playing with publisher & came up with some apple cartons, quite pleased with the result, ignore the work bench top, just picked up something  handy as a prop
but boxes need filling, which requires a packing shed
but a have a vague idea of a animated scene with roller conveyors,
but the conundrum is NEW boxes beeing filled would quite soon get wear & tear on them as they move around such an exhibit, & then not look quite right.
never mind cross that bridge when we get to it.
first is the shed. Not going to be a new build but an upgrade of a building already been used, as a store, then a workshop, and a photo background for SBS in progress


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 16, 2010, 04:46:00 AM
When first built in 2002 this was my first attempt at large scale (1/12th) on reflection the stonework  was more mosaic than masonry


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 16, 2010, 04:48:45 AM
But the over all effect was not too bad, just needs the mortar toning down & some weathering  adding


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 16, 2010, 04:50:17 AM
Or could do one wall rendered & coloured up




Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 16, 2010, 04:54:11 AM
The interior having seen use for heavy engineering, will be in need of a fresh coat of paint for food handling hygene



Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: Chuck Doan on November 17, 2010, 10:56:03 AM
In 1/12th scale, that must be a pretty large building!


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 19, 2010, 10:44:25 AM
Hi Chuck
from memory its about 30 x 22 inches.

Been having fun with publisher making apple boxes But got distracted by finding a Geest banana box in the attic.
As top cover is printed on white no probs used 160gsm card  & serndipily found an off cut of brown kraft paper, no idea what or even where it came from, but enough to get 3 A4 sheet out of, to make the bases.
I have in the past used hundreds of in real life & the real ones achieve that saggy dip in the top cover when the humidity is high  ;D  ;D

Oh & post script, that black line delineating each face of the boxes, now annoys me, & mark 2 apple & banana boxes now have them removed


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 19, 2010, 11:03:36 AM
Mark 2 banana boxes

back to the drawing board, doh,  just noticed also lost the 'handles' when redrawing    :'(

OK mark 3 then  ::)   ;D


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: Ray Dunakin on November 19, 2010, 11:35:20 AM
These miniature produce boxes look great!


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: eTraxx on November 19, 2010, 11:36:56 AM
Those are Great! Gives me tons of ideas


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: Malachi Constant on November 19, 2010, 01:31:04 PM
Looking good!  Eliminating the line between the faces is definitely an improvement ... has a bit of a toy-like effect WITH the line, but looks quite convincing WITHOUT the line.  Bummer about the handles!  :-\

Cheers,
Dallas


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 19, 2010, 03:35:13 PM
No sweat Dallas I can hide them in a pallet load with mark 3s showing ends  ;D


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: BKLN on November 19, 2010, 03:51:36 PM
What about the bananas?


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 19, 2010, 04:15:04 PM
You want me to go Bananas?????        :D


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 22, 2010, 08:16:58 AM
Just realised those banana boxes are not complete, they should have a top & bottom sheet of very stiff brown paper with ventilation holes in, to stop the fruit falling out, piece of thin card  strip, cut, & folded into zig zag to keep the top sheet in place


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 22, 2010, 08:27:24 AM
The card ventilation sheets were clamped together about 30 at a time & drilled with a sharp suitable drill.
a lot quicker than using a plier punch & doing 20 holes individually per sheet in about 60 sheets.
clamped together, & holding the top sheet down close to the drill with a pair fine nose pliers gives clean cut holes

work bench top starting to take shape
design,
 heavy duty top, on removable trestles, make full use of fork lift!
for flexible use of work space during harvest / non harvest periods


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 22, 2010, 08:31:44 AM
When I redrew the apple boxes, & removed the black lines, I decided that if I also did it to the printing on the pallet loads it would have no definition of separate boxes, so left the lines on there but wrapped the pallets with cling film, as in real life, whitch softens the look a bit


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: finescalerr on November 22, 2010, 01:47:06 PM
The scene is satisfactory. -- Russ


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 22, 2010, 04:29:00 PM
There's a long way to go yet!!
the mortar joins in the wall were bugging me
sorta overstated . 

So

apply coat of slurpy mix acrylic/pva/fine sand/ water, to smooth edges of stones, found sand not fine enough, so lightly sand down with green emery sponge 180- 200 grade?? 
& give 2 coats of acrylic, looks better, but still wet when took pic, see what the morning brings then out with the colours


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 24, 2010, 03:55:22 AM
First colour applied, a slighty diluted acrylic, burnt sienna by Royal & Langnickel
dabbed on with a stiff brush & wiped on with a very fine weave cotton cloth


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 24, 2010, 03:57:55 AM
second colour, an ivory acrylic, different make, name elludes me, bit more diluted to give a finer speckly finish eventually



Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 24, 2010, 05:00:46 AM
This is the stone work that I used as a reference, I think its called pink granite, red tones are accentuated in different lighting conditions,


 


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 24, 2010, 05:03:01 AM
I want to slightly empasise the red aspect a bit, but not 'spot' red as here 


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 24, 2010, 05:07:10 AM
But a bit stonger than here
these are all the same building, built  about 1860


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: Ray Dunakin on November 24, 2010, 12:15:58 PM
second colour, an ivory acrylic, different make, name elludes me, bit more diluted to give a finer speckly finish eventually


This is looking pretty good to me!


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 24, 2010, 01:24:17 PM
next tone down the white a bit, using a coarse cloth well dipped in water
( after allowing paint to dry 12 hours in a dry warm 22C atmosphere)



Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 24, 2010, 01:27:09 PM
Then apply carefully some light gray  in the mortar lines to cover any white & red that strayed



Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 24, 2010, 01:32:04 PM
Now I am not trying to copy the colouring on the school wall,
 but standing back a bit, this is still too red, so I think I will go for an application of light gray in the same way as I did the ivory, which came out in a way that surprised me, in its random speckliness


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 25, 2010, 08:31:04 AM
Gray added at 50- 50 water - acrylic

still looks too red to me & I think needs variety in the colouring
too many stones the same
plus it could do with a black/ brown  wash


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 25, 2010, 12:58:44 PM
gave a few stones a grey colour, needs the wash next


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 26, 2010, 04:55:23 AM
Been playing with rainwater down pipes, not got it right, too fragile, think it needs reinforcing on the joints on the inside so it dont show,  and I think the bottom elbow angle is too square, needs to be a bit more sloping


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 26, 2010, 01:07:07 PM
wash applied, think thats as far as I can go with the outside walls, colour is as I want it, dont like the sand particles still showing up, but too late for that now will know better next time.
I think that when I previously used sand I used a very fine mesh sieve.  but couldnt find it this time.


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: finescalerr on November 26, 2010, 01:56:44 PM
It really has come a long way (night and day!) and looks pretty darned good.

If the reddish coloration is as strong in person as in the photo (with its overall amber color balance), perhaps you could devise a way to tone it down slightly. Even if you can't, it's just a matter of my personal preference; we probably could find several examples of stones of the same color as yours.

Either way, at this point, the wall still has a very homogeneous overall appearance so it's time to apply some subtle weathering to "wake it up". I think, when you do that, you will have achieved a minor modeling miracle.

Russ


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on November 26, 2010, 03:29:20 PM
Thanks Russ, probably the lighting where I am working is poor, the room faces due south, so I get either full strong sunlight, or when overcast the room light is an energy saver that I dont like. And the secondary source of light, tungsten is fixed underneath a shelf  & is not very flexible as to adjustment of angle, must fix the anglepoise :-[
The pic I took after I did some random stones with gray, before I did the washes, made it look to me like a chess board.
there is in close up however quite a bit of difference in the individual colouration,
I might try a few aplications of stipple with different colours like I did with the ivory in reply 20, but instead of blanket application I may try a few stones at random & with diff tones


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: artizen on November 26, 2010, 05:12:14 PM
That cruel enlargement actually looks quite realistic!


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: finescalerr on November 26, 2010, 07:03:15 PM
Yeah, it does.

To my eye, the wall needs a general blending application to bring everything together. Some of the guys probably could suggest a really good way to do that. Typically one would use some kind of wash, an overspray of some dilute color, an overall dusting with weathering powders, or something more arcane. If it were my model, I'd wait until some of the Masters chime in before messing with it. -- Russ


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 07, 2010, 09:11:39 AM
What I had forgotten was that as this building was so big, to save on weight, I had cut out holes in the floor, The first one on the left near the door intending to be an inspection pit for rolling stock/engines


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 07, 2010, 09:14:13 AM
As a consequense of this I had made the floor, & back right hand side wall to be removable


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 07, 2010, 09:18:49 AM
So now I have two choices, either build up the packing shed interior, on here, the original insert,

Or

Or build a new interior so they are interchangable

( sorry about the poser, he's just had his leg reset in plaster ) :'(  ;D

Edit;-   actually I should finish this first insert, those grey pillars were supposed to originally be for supporting powerline pedestals for overhead pulley feeds to machinery, and as I now have obtained a mamod workshop base at a carboot sale for a song, I could actually finish it!! ;D :D


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 07, 2010, 09:22:46 AM
Just noticed on this end wall, I think I used a much weaker wash, & the pigments seem to have run down the wall & collected on the plinth top & dried there without leaving run marks



Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 09, 2010, 08:25:15 AM
So here's the new insert floor & short back wall that will be hidden under the new benching,
photoed outside the building


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 09, 2010, 03:22:27 PM
Insert placed inside, Playing with boxes while waiting for glue to dry.
Slate floor slabs need texture & dirt, a different floor insert will be made to replace the track shown there.
There are plans for an 'artistic' display on the back wall, the owners collection of old apple box ends with their artwork"! ;D


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 09, 2010, 05:01:39 PM
Been working on the bench tops


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 09, 2010, 05:05:54 PM
and the slate floor, needs more stains & clutter but have got a nice texture using a wash of acrylic, powder filler & water,


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 09, 2010, 05:09:08 PM
The tyre marks are almost realistic, the fork lift tyres are a hard plastic, so wont squash down & give a full width tyre track as in real life :D


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 09, 2010, 05:13:05 PM
Through the doorway,
the floor slabs are scale 3ft x 2ft pieces of Kellogs cornflake packets guillotined to size


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 09, 2010, 05:15:12 PM
Doors closed for the night,  hometime. ;D


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: finescalerr on December 09, 2010, 08:27:12 PM
Looking better and better. And the coloration, in natural light, appears to be darned good. -- Russ


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 10, 2010, 05:37:29 PM
Thanks Russ

the guy in charge of the shed has a soft spot for old apple box adverts, but as the boxes took up too much room, he has just kept one end of each,& put battens on the end wall & banged a nail through each to keep them in place


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: Frederic Testard on December 10, 2010, 05:38:47 PM
I love your last shots, Don (not that I didn't with the previous ones...).


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 10, 2010, 05:44:05 PM
Thanks Frederic,


I am having trouble finding artwork for appleboxes (old Wooden ones) on the internet, there's loads of pics of american boxes.
 but I dont seem to be able to find pics of ones I remember from 50 yrs ago here in the UK
anyone any ideas?


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 11, 2010, 05:55:35 AM
The end picture wall insert is meant to be removable, so it is a piece of thin card, given a coat of ivory acrylic same as main wall behind , but with the addition of some PVA white to seal & strengthen it, the battens to mount the box ends on are strips cut with a craft knife from a veg crates side of 2mm thick wood, the box ends( 1.5 mm ply) are glued to the battens & each other with PVA for greater structural strength, when dry each end was drilled .8mm & a dressmakers pin inserted & cut off size from the back, would have liked something with a more in keeping look than the brass type pin heads, but being impecunious I used what I had to hand



Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: Junior on December 11, 2010, 07:55:09 AM
Amazing idea with the box ends. Everything else looks great too!

Anders ;D


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 11, 2010, 04:44:36 PM
You can actually buy fruitbox artwork, framed in copper on the net, singly, for about $45-$85!!!


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: chester on December 11, 2010, 05:06:24 PM
Nice shots so far, impressive work Don.
Here are a few fruit crate labels I have. Sorry, all from the U.S.

http://s191.photobucket.com/albums/z79/chesterf/Advertisements/






.


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: Frederic Testard on December 11, 2010, 05:44:24 PM
It is strange, Chester. My browser displays images from all your albums except this one.


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 12, 2010, 08:28:07 AM
been playing with thin wood to make some different apple boxes

one with a split corner
one with a split side


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 12, 2010, 09:36:13 AM
One thats weathered gray with age
then tried a proper orange box, but got it wrong, made it TOOOO long, & I think the slats should have gaps between for ventilation, which apple boxes dont seem to have


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 12, 2010, 09:46:00 AM
Then I realised as pva glue seals the wood surface, stain wont take where it escapes onto the wood surface.
So, decided it would be logical to stain the wood before assembly,
whilst doing it  just tried the wash brush on some card. Got an unexpected result as the card had obviously got cracked, but was not visible until the wash highlighted it, Thought it would make a good method of making a realistic crack in an old plaster wall if done appropriately
What do you think

Think it might have possibilities for printing wall paper pattern straight onto the card then fold the card till it cracks, then highlight with a wash to bring out the crack


My wife however has other ideas, she says it lookls like a crack in  tarmac


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: NORCALLOGGER on December 12, 2010, 10:51:38 AM
Don,
I have been following your thread with interest as I remember packing sheds from my childhood.

This probably has no bearing on your project but the apple boxes we used (we had 2 different kinds) were different then what your showing.
One type was similar to yours, and we called them "cannnery boxes", they had 1/2 or 3/4 inch air gaps between the boards on the bottom and sides with a cleat nailed on the top ends that extended inward about an inch.

The other type box was called a "field lug"and was used for the graded eating apples it was the same length as the cannery box but wider and shallower, only two layers of apples deep.  This box also had the lugs on the ends.

For winter storage of the boxes they were stacked as follows;
The Cannery Boxes
One box placed on the floor, one box stood on end inside it and one box turned upside down over it making a compact bundle of 3 boxes.  These bundles were then stored in very big stacks.


The Field Lugs.
These were stacked similar but 2 lugs were placed on end in the middle with the openings facing each other.

Of course before all this stacking was done all the boxes had to be checked and bad boards replaced and nails tightened or added. The old well house was stacked full of "box Shook" kept on hand for repairs.

At least that is how it was done by us 50+ years ago in the Apple Country north of San Francisco.

Great project you have going thanks for sharing it with us.
Rick


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 12, 2010, 11:16:34 AM
Thanks Rick thats very interesting, so I presume the cleat on the top ends were to give separation to the boxes when stacked to improve ventilation?
 so is your climate hot & dry?,
 would I be right in thinking  also that the 'cannery boxes' then did not travel a long distance, but locally so that they could be returned economically?
I have worked in markets & empty banana boxes ( thou recycled rather than refilled with fuit) were stacked similarly, each base inside top cover, opposite to normal way, one inside end on, & another on top making a neat nest of 3
A lorry driver working the fruit runs from channel ferries to London Markets made this obsevation, that for ventilation purposes fruit on pallets would not be cling wrapped before reaching market, as they would sweat & rot

I cant remember ( also from 50 years ago) seeing apple boxes still sealed, so cant say if ours had cleats on top, but I dont remember the wood apple boxes having any gaps between the slats, though I clearly remember the double orange crates doing so.

Maybe different climates dictated different conditions of transport,
& maybe oranges  need to be kept cooler than apples


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: marc_reusser on December 12, 2010, 03:47:25 PM
The cardboard packin boxes and wrapped pallets look incredibly real (the palletes themselves are nvery nice as well). Beautifully done.

M


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: NORCALLOGGER on December 12, 2010, 09:19:50 PM
Hi Don,
I think the cleats were for ventilation plus an aid in handling the boxes both empty and full, as well as added structural strength.  Which was the #1 priority?  I have no idea.

The climate down there is wet rainy winters and hot (90-100+ degrees) dry summers.  Didn't mean to mislead you, the boxes were stored in barns and sheds out of the weather. 

The Cannery boxes traveled from the "ranch" to the packing shed/cannery sometimes but mostly they stayed on the ranch.  They were used to pick and carry "wind falls" then loaded on the pickup or tractor and trailer and hauled to the "loading dock" (on the ranch) where they were dumped into "tubs".  These tubs were 4ft square and 4 foot high made of wood and sitting on their own pallet.  These tubs were placed on the ton and a half truck and the cannery boxes were dumped into them.  I think the apples were sold by weight for sauce, cider, etc. 

Picking “windfalls”, if you have never done that you have missed a rare treat.  As the apples grow they force each other off the stems and they fall to the ground.  Likewise the wind can cause them to fall.  The orchards are disced in the summer to keep weeds down so you have about 8-10 inches of dry powder dust that the apples fall into.  The windfalls have to be gathered before the sun gets at them as they sunburn rapidly in that climate.  To gather windfalls on 25 acres you start about 4 AM and work like hell to about 8-9 AM throwing them in cannery boxes and stacking them along the driveways for pickup. 

The real fun part is; as it starts becoming daylight and warming up the Yellow Jackets come out and crawl all over the burnt spots on the apples that fell the previous afternoon.  As you grab the apples out of the dust you grab a hand full of YJ and get stung, it happened at least once and usually 2-3 times every morning. 

As a 10 -12 year old kid I made about 65-100 dollars each season picking windfalls at a nickel a box, you do the math.  I’m amazed that I can still eat apples and enjoy them.

The field lugs of apples were handled differently.  They were hauled to the packing shed in the field lugs and spilled out for inspection and grading.  No bruising or sunburn or the whole lot was thrown into the canners, hell of a price difference.  You sure didn’t want them thrown out as you had usually already paid your itinerate pickers, but you usually had trust in them as the same ones came back year after year.

Thanks for the memories.
Rick


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 13, 2010, 07:22:35 AM
Thanks greatly for the info Rick.`So I wonder if the changeover from wood boxes to preprinted card cartons in the late 50s early 60s also coincided with the increase in refrigerated transport for fruit as it probably reduced the need for card apple boxes at least not to have ventilation holes in?


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: NORCALLOGGER on December 13, 2010, 06:57:01 PM
Hi Don,
I think that the emergence of the cardboard carton and the wire/veneer crates my have had something to do with the advancing refrigeration technology but feel that it had more to do with the rapid dissappearence of the Suger Pine and White Pine that that was the main source of box shook.  The scarcity of good wood would of course drive up the prices on what was available.

If interested in this industry (box shook to cardboard) a good source of information is a book by Tim Purdy called "Fruit Growers Supply Company'  Hilt - Susanville - Westwood - Burney  Published by Lahontan Images in 2000.
A very fasinating book if interested in this sort of thing.  I basically discusses the wood box industry in the pine forest of northern California.

As an aside the wooden box industry in the Pine forests of Northern California is alive and well, even if on a more limited basis from the "glory days" of box factories.  A local family owned (since the 1890's) steam powered sawmill still cuts box shook and produces custom boxes.
You can check them out here.


http://www.phillipsbrosmill.com/phillipsbrosmill/Flash/default.htm

Later
Rick


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 14, 2010, 06:24:09 AM
Thanks Rick using that link I found a few more links
Sunkist timeline, althou citrus rather than apple, its historically interesting as to trends affecting product & shipping


http://groups.yahoo.com/group/citrusmodeling/messages/277?xm=1&m=e&l=1
which led to
http://www.sunkist.com/flash/timeline.html
and
http://foodservice.sunkist.com/tour/tour.asp


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 14, 2010, 05:38:27 PM
If your workforce are standing on stone slabs all day they get leg pains, so slatted duckboards have been provided for their comfort, but they wont stay this colour for very long,

The wood for this has come from a small clementine fruit tray, recycle!


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 14, 2010, 05:48:53 PM
The cardboard packin boxes and wrapped pallets look incredibly real (the palletes themselves are nvery nice as well). Beautifully done.

M
Thanks for your comments Marc,
Its interesting about the pallet wrapping, a lorry driver who moves fruit & veg from Europe into UK markets said they dont wrap with plastic, as it encourages sweat & rot, but I see on the Sunkist web site, "timeline" a pic of them wrapping oranges on pallets,
so I guess you pays yer money & takes yer pick! ;D

Edit;-  my mistake it was not the timeline link, but this one
http://foodservice.sunkist.com/tour/tour.asp 
& pic 19
 


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: marc_reusser on December 17, 2010, 03:58:03 AM

If interested in this industry (box shook to cardboard) a good source of information is a book by Tim Purdy called "Fruit Growers Supply Company'  Hilt - Susanville - Westwood - Burney  Published by Lahontan Images in 2000.
A very fasinating book if interested in this sort of thing.  I basically discusses the wood box industry in the pine forest of northern California.

As an aside the wooden box industry in the Pine forests of Northern California is alive and well, even if on a more limited basis from the "glory days" of box factories.  A local family owned (since the 1890's) steam powered sawmill still cuts box shook and produces custom boxes.
You can check them out here.


http://www.phillipsbrosmill.com/phillipsbrosmill/Flash/default.htm

Later
Rick

The Purdy book is a good one.  I have a copy of a film from the RRLCo. that shows the entire process of making box shook...sort of a "from tree to box" type film.

M


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: Philip Smith on December 17, 2010, 09:01:44 AM
Very interesting packing shed. Yet another history lesson.

Your crates and labels are very nice. I can almost smell the produce!

Philip


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 21, 2010, 04:48:29 PM
The duck boarding has  been coloured up, but still too even, must try to remember to add sploshes to it when painting other things

No idea what he's doing with that crowbar!



Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 21, 2010, 04:54:09 PM
Designed some in house labels for the sheds "heritage" output, or is the jargon "Retro"

for those that dont know, over here the govmt sponsers a healthy eating campaign urging one to eat ""5 a Day""
so the proprietors of this packing operation have slanted their slogan to take advantage of that publicity


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 21, 2010, 04:56:30 PM
Contrast these rather decrepit, old, stored at random, weathered naturally, boxes


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 21, 2010, 05:04:09 PM
Its been decided that an overhead, office,/ overseers position would add interest, not sure yet wether to enclose it for comfort, or leave it open, as its use as a packing shed would be seasonal, although it probably would be used in winter periods for maintenance tasks on vehicles & equipement.
So designing stairs, with quarter or 'winder' steps to make a bend, instead of a plain flat landing

 


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: artizen on December 21, 2010, 07:28:08 PM
I can tell you are really enjoying yourself with this build. Excellent work and research, keep it up.

BTW - where did you get the overseer figure from? Completely off-topic, I just picked up a block of Top Gear soap with an embedded Stig inside which is actually correct size etc for 1:24!!!!! I just gave myself a Christmas present!


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 22, 2010, 04:40:25 AM
The figures were found in a cheapo barn, they were 6 in an acrylic tube for £2.99
so for 50p each I got a 1/12th scale paratrooper in camouflage, all jointed like action men figs but smaller, some like this one I have left so they can be posed in different positions.
When repainted they look like they are wearing workmens boiler suits

Some I have filled the joints with milliput to  make them more realistic


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 22, 2010, 04:24:43 PM
mock up floor & support to see if it will work out in practice


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 22, 2010, 04:26:19 PM
Headroom clearance plausible


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 22, 2010, 04:31:12 PM
Make a start on floor deck, decided to try plywood, but instead of just scoring the surface, ripped into strips & positioned so as to alter grain flow,  supported by joists ripped out of a cupboard shelf on my saw table.
 Not sure if I like it or not,


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 22, 2010, 04:32:53 PM
Used an old blunt scriber to do the nail holes


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 22, 2010, 04:40:54 PM
Deck mounted on RSJ supported by pole column with wood pad to avoid steel  spitting pole ( grain across RSJ)
other end pocketed into wall ( thats not the correct term. But cant remember the correct expression)
Newel posts made & fixed
support column tied into rest of structure with strip wood that will be the base for another bench/shelf
window frames started.


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 22, 2010, 04:46:38 PM
Sam doing a try out, now the hand rails are fitted
need to decide on either just hand rails around the floor area or box it in with glazed partions
may go back to the windows while I think about it


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: finescalerr on December 23, 2010, 03:24:45 AM
Coming along nicely. -- Russ


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: Philip Smith on December 23, 2010, 07:06:14 PM
NICE evenly spaced job cutting the steps in! That had to be a pain!?

Philip


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 30, 2010, 06:54:41 AM
Did a wash on the floorboards, dont really like this type wood grain, too pronounced,


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 30, 2010, 07:04:26 AM
To support the back RSJ that holds up the floor, I cut a hole in the false wall to fix a bracket to a stub of RSJ  fixed into the wall, bit brace & belt,

cemented a flat bit in behind to ensure a good firm anchor ( no pulling out through wall)


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 30, 2010, 07:33:45 AM
Filled hole with green putty
& gave a coat of acrylic red oxide


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 30, 2010, 07:45:40 AM
Supports in place,
love the early morning light coming in on that back beam


Edit;- oops floating stairs, need to skim a thought off the front support column


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 30, 2010, 07:53:08 AM
Knew I saved this for a good reason, salvaged from an ornamental figurine that got dropped on the floor.
Is it worth hiding or removing that "Q" word?
Yep, screw head need invisiblising


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 30, 2010, 07:55:35 AM
Temporary junk repository


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on December 30, 2010, 07:59:02 AM
Close up of well oiled chain, No rust here


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: Frederic Testard on December 30, 2010, 05:28:55 PM
It looks very nice, Don.


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on January 01, 2011, 03:22:05 PM
Thought the clock did not look quite right to me, so took it down & added a box bit underneath, that some older clocks seem to have,
& hid the word 'Quartz' by using a line of very fine dots of ivory acrylic paint


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on January 01, 2011, 03:27:11 PM
Found a couple of green containers of "Rubbish Slime" in a toy shop, painted one black for "landfill only",
the other is for recycling, must remove the word 'rubbish' & hope I eventually get round to fitting wheels.
So then we will have a pair of the Ubiquitous Wheelie Bins


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on January 13, 2011, 10:34:29 AM
Been assembling a collection of bits & pieces to put in odd corners of shed.
I am leaning towards muiltiple use of this shed, after all, packing of produce cant take place at full capicity for all 12 months of the year, so in out of season it will also be used as a vehicle maintenance & overhaul shop, which would allow me to use things like these cam belts, inspired by reading Christian & Anders Junior garage threads

Mmmhh, looks like someone packed them inside out   ;D

This is 1/12 BTW, thats a small enamel paint tin in the back ground


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on January 13, 2011, 10:38:28 AM
Collection of bits some in dirty/rusty condition, some well painted


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on January 13, 2011, 10:49:39 AM
I have made a base to stand beside the workshop, for outside storage shed of old boxes etc
its made up by laminating cereal box card both sides of a 10mm sheet of polystyrene, yes that horrible messy stuff, but it was free.
Adding a 2nd layer of said ps & then another layer of card, forming a very light but yet strong base, then sealing the edges with more card.

Thats pegleg Karl asking Ian which cam belt he needs, the 9x or the 6x, for the forks


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on January 31, 2011, 08:44:25 AM
Back to the stairs, in my real life, leanto garden shed I have open rafters that come in very handy to poke things up through to keep the ground clear for my wheelchair, wood, odd bits of pipe, etc. etc. are out of the way above the eyeline, but always to hand when I remember  they are there. So I thought, thats what would happen under the floor between the support beams behind the stairway in the model.
3 clusters of bits that will slide in under the floor. lightly glued so that they dont fall apart when being transported



Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on January 31, 2011, 08:49:46 AM
2 long black bits from off an old fire spark guard, a long bit of 10mm styrene tube, long so that from any underneath photo shot they look of useful size to save, could be for a deep half round rainwater gutter,
on top, short offcuts of smaller diam tube, short as they will only be seen from front edge when in place, all super glued together


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on January 31, 2011, 08:51:39 AM
4 bits of scale lumber 3/8ths inch square, held together by pva gluing a bit of thin card to the TOP at the back



Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on January 31, 2011, 08:53:59 AM
Odd scraps of wood with interesting end profiles pva'ed together


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on January 31, 2011, 08:56:25 AM
Partially in place, nice snug fit so they dont slide out, but removable if I want to do a scenery change



Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on January 31, 2011, 08:58:01 AM
Front 3/4 view from underneath


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on January 31, 2011, 09:01:19 AM
view from back not normaly seeable, but I have removed the stair unit from the shed so as to get daylight through the window on it. It is far to cold to take outside to photo.

The messy infill below the stairs was not meant to be viewable when in situ


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on January 31, 2011, 09:02:53 AM
A few boxes posed for more visual interest


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: Frederic Testard on January 31, 2011, 03:54:06 PM
I love the detailing of your scene. It looks natural and gives the viewer a nice number of focal points.


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: Junior on January 31, 2011, 04:54:30 PM
Been assembling a collection of bits & pieces to put in odd corners of shed.
I am leaning towards muiltiple use of this shed, after all, packing of produce cant take place at full capicity for all 12 months of the year, so in out of season it will also be used as a vehicle maintenance & overhaul shop, which would allow me to use things like these cam belts, inspired by reading Christian & Anders Junior garage threads

Mmmhh, looks like someone packed them inside out   ;D

This is 1/12 BTW, thats a small enamel paint tin in the back ground
Very nice work Don with lots of great details. Here´s my paint can and a fan belt hope you will be able to see it.

Anders ::)


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on February 01, 2011, 07:16:20 AM
Ha Ha!!
all the more respect for what your doing Anders, I recon I would be crosseyed working in that scale now that I am pushing 70!
I could not see it till I enlarged the view   ;D


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: Ray Dunakin on February 01, 2011, 08:57:10 PM
The pipes and lumber stored under the platform is a great detailing idea!


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on February 03, 2011, 04:46:21 AM
Meanwhile back at the Ranch, or outside on the new base, has appeared the top of an underground water storage tank, in the form of a concrete slab.
with locating lugs for .  .  .


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on February 03, 2011, 04:49:55 AM
.  .  .  a lean to shed, made from 4 uprights & a roof of an old redundant Wherry deck cover from down in the Canal Basin.



Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on February 03, 2011, 04:54:10 AM
Close up of locating pockets.


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on February 03, 2011, 04:57:19 AM
A tank needs a protected vent & a manhole cover


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on February 03, 2011, 05:11:20 PM
Insert some mesh from a redundant fire spark guard,

oops, it needs reworking, the levels are wrong, that could lead to a trip hazard


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on February 04, 2011, 03:21:09 AM
Ok, so cut it up, redid the levels & did a bit of painting, needs a bit more attention to detail & a concrete finish to the slab.



 


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on February 04, 2011, 05:14:58 PM
Been doing a bit more to the concrete base, & given the manhole cover a lick more paint

( Concrete is still wet )


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: Ray Dunakin on February 04, 2011, 10:20:36 PM
That turned out nice. Interesting method for producing the diamond tread texture.


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on February 05, 2011, 03:59:26 AM
That turned out nice. Interesting method for producing the diamond tread texture.


Yes cant remember where I read it, either 7/8s or Gn15 forums

One thing I found as the mesh is painted steel, it wont glue propery to the styrene with solvent, corners lift etc.

So I used superglue,  cyanocrylate, this not only held the mesh but partially rounded the diamond 'pockets'.
& I also used revell enamel paint to avoid any water in acrylics from causing rust, as this part of the model, the concrete base & barel roof shed will be outside on Stoneycome quarries in the summer ( when it does rain)


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on February 07, 2011, 04:33:50 PM
Still more to do, but interim pic of lean-to





Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on February 07, 2011, 04:34:52 PM
end view thro netting


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on February 07, 2011, 04:39:49 PM
And as I had done a manhole for the water tank, why not do some not yet in use as props for clutter in sheds & on wagons etc, so used more styrene
Street drain in centre
modern pressed steel inspection cover on left
Cast iron diamond pattern one  on right
these are first efforts if the bug bites I may be tempted to do some more accurate ones dimensional & detail wise


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on February 22, 2012, 07:48:19 AM
been experimenting with clay roof tiles, trying for moss clumps, think its a bit coarse a texture



 


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: lab-dad on February 22, 2012, 08:15:19 AM
I think it looks good!
May be a little thick?
Also needs to "leech" outward, not such an abrupt edge?

What did you use?

-Marty


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on February 22, 2012, 09:30:34 AM
I think it looks good!
May be a little thick?
Also needs to "leech" outward, not such an abrupt edge?

What did you use?

-Marty
The moss we get here is quite like pincushions in shape about 1" thick with almost vertical edges
The tiles were made from card tube & I was trying to hide the spiral paper joint, tried first with a squiggle of black paint to confuse the eye, but that did not work



So I next painted a wider area with acrylic dark green & sprinkled dried builders sand
over
BUT as the sand was a red devon sand it dried brown & even a thin green wash would not cover the dark colour


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on February 22, 2012, 09:52:47 AM
So I made up a mix of green acrylic paint, white PVA glue, & as I could not find my fine powder filler plaster ( polyfiller in UK ) I used what was to hand, a left over tube of tile grout/fixer, this allowed me to drip it on & get a rounded edge to the moss, it also helped that I had preheated the roof with a hair dryer so that it started to dry fairly quickly without running
must see if I can get a pic of the local moss


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: finescalerr on February 22, 2012, 05:20:46 PM
I would guess the color in the photos might be slightly saturated but, if it is accurate, toning down the colors (including the black wash) and maybe using a slightly less coarse sand would put you just about where you want to be. Even now it looks pretty good. -- Russ


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on February 23, 2012, 12:49:06 PM

Thanks for the comments,
Lump of moss photoed this marning in subdued winter light, blackbirds tend to dig it all up this time of year for nest lining, as you can see its a bit brighter than my interpretation, & quite lumpy. 
 after thinking about it, I will try using a fine filler in acrylic to try & keep the irregularity in the surface but smooth out the sharpness, if that dont work I will have to find my fine sieve & revert to sand

 


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on February 24, 2012, 07:20:25 AM
Found a decent pic of the moss I wanted to depict at
http://www.flickr.com/photos/fudj/66512501/



Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on March 02, 2012, 11:29:20 AM
While doing the roof tiles I got side tracked by the look & feel of other Terracotta ware, so after a bit of rubber necking, I produced these chimney pots. My favourite is the very old ones that appear to be hand thrown & are slightly beer belly shaped. as opposed to the factory made ones that were spun cast, & thus more even



Also did a few spare roof tiles to use as clutter in the weeds





Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: marc_reusser on March 05, 2012, 12:30:33 AM
Don,

I actually like the moss clumps, but I think your color is quite off. I would recommend you try Vallejo #079 "Golden Olive", & #118 "Midlestone", youcould also throw in some GameColor #035 "Dead Flesh"

...then shade and vary by adding in yellow or darker green.


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on March 08, 2012, 10:29:00 AM
Don,

I actually like the moss clumps, but I think your color is quite off. I would recommend you try Vallejo #079 "Golden Olive", & #118 "Midlestone", youcould also throw in some GameColor #035 "Dead Flesh"

...then shade and vary by adding in yellow or darker green.

Thanks Marc, couldnt see those colours on Vallejo's site so as to get an idea.
However due to my car packing up & having to be scrapped, & having to finance a replacement ( with wheelchair ramp this time) I am having to use what I have at hand, no expense allowed, so I have used a stone wash I had mixed previously, applied thinly & dabbed off again to leave small mini spots of variation, then did same with a yellow wash.
Not sure think I prefer it as it was previously.
Of course moss changes colour enormously through the year emerald green here in a wet spring, through to brown bordering black in the heat of summer
Mayhap I'll let it bide awhile till I build the support for the roof & see what the whole looks like, Got to look out some bricks thsat I KNOW I have somewhere?


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: Ray Dunakin on March 08, 2012, 11:28:07 PM
I think the moss looks a lot better now. But what are those two large yellow spots?


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on March 09, 2012, 01:46:43 AM
I think the moss looks a lot better now. But what are those two large yellow spots?

Ray,
the yellow spots are my attempt at doing these, I believe its a type of lichen that grows that colour when in seagull droppings of which we get quite a lot, in this pic the growths are upto 3-4 inches in diam. Due to the quickly drying surface, glass fibre skin roof, they are quite thin & flat =- pic 1


On the other hand this example in Pic 2 is growing on 1/2 in ply, which stays wet longer, and is where smaller birds poop on the roof of an old bird feeder table/house & is more structured & thicker, the moss here is growing in a crack in the ply that keeps wet for longer




Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on March 09, 2012, 02:01:43 AM
As you can see there is quite arange of colour difference & in fact when all the content of the "fertiliser" is used up the Lichen looks like it reverts to its normal sage green colour
Got to tone that yellow down a bit though, I think




Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: artizen on March 09, 2012, 05:19:29 AM
This model is a fairly large scale? The moss looks like the texture you get with moss rocks used in florist displays.

http://www.save-on-crafts.com/ballmoss.html


Title: Re: The Packing Shed
Post by: granitechops on March 09, 2012, 07:41:26 AM
This model is a fairly large scale? The moss looks like the texture you get with moss rocks used in florist displays.

http://www.save-on-crafts.com/ballmoss.html
those artificial moss balls look a lot finer than the moss we get here
as to scale, I am working in  1/12