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General Category => Painting & Weathering Techniques => Topic started by: DaKra on October 15, 2010, 02:07:24 PM



Title: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: DaKra on October 15, 2010, 02:07:24 PM
Last year I struggled to make a stucco wall section on a diorama, it took a full day of experimenting with various methods before I basically gave up.   I resorted to "cheating" by lasering a photo of stucco texture onto a gesso prepped plywood panel.  It came out great, but it bothered me that I didn't have a hand-applied method I could include as part of the finishing instructions in a kit.  So here is something I'm working on now, which I think looks just as good.   I'm interested in learning any other methods. 

The model is a 1920s era filling station.  Many of these humble structures were designed with a jaunty style and make very interesting models.   This one will go in a NYC urban scene and provide an interesting contrast with the brick tenements. 

Here is the naked plywood base. 

 


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: DaKra on October 15, 2010, 02:13:25 PM
Step 1  is mix up a slurry of Durhams Water Putty, acrylic paint and water.   By volume I mixed about 1 part paint, 1 part putty and about 1 part water.  Its not critical but it should have the consistency of butter milk or pancake batter.  This gets brushed on the model, being careful to avoid building up thick fillets under details.           




Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: DaKra on October 15, 2010, 02:15:17 PM
I applied two coats, waiting to dry, then sanding in between.  If I were working in 1/48 scale, or larger, this might be the only step.  But HO requires finesse to keep things in correct scale and proportion.  Also its important to consider the prototype.  Stucco comes in many forms.   If I were building a medieval half timber house for a WW2 ETO diorama, in 1/35 I would try to achieve a coarse, heavily weathered look.  But this gas station was coated in a decorative stucco, and since the diorama is set in the 1930s, it will show no more than 15 years of age.  It should not be very coarse. 

So this application gets sanded down.  Basically its going to serve only as a grain filler that provides a subtly wavy and uneven surface for the final texture and paint.  A fiber paint sanding pad makes short work of this.   


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: DaKra on October 15, 2010, 02:23:31 PM
Now two coats of automotive primer go on.   I used Krylon.  For most of my scale model purposes, this stuff is too thick.  I set it aside as useless, until I thought of this.   

The first coat goes on smooth and will serve as a filler for any small scratches left behind by the sanding.   So now I have a smooth but subtly uneven surface, it just lacks a little surface texture.     

So after its sort of dry, like 5 minutes, I hit it again with the primer, but I sprayed it on "wrong".   Instead of holding it the proper distance, I held it back a little over two feet, like a noob does, and ended up with that sandpaper finish that looks terrible on everything.  But perfect for this. 

All for now.  Next I will paint and weather.       

Dave


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: eTraxx on October 15, 2010, 02:59:02 PM
Bravo! Excellent thread. I've used the 'noob' technique for a slight texture for rust.


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: Mobilgas on October 15, 2010, 03:36:08 PM
Dave,    I like the effect for HO didn't cover up the detail on the building......don't look to thick. Being a gas station nut ;D I'm curious as what brand gas will this station be selling?    Craig


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: DaKra on October 15, 2010, 04:14:48 PM
Funny you should ask that Craig, as I don't really know for sure what brand gas station this was.   The prototype photo I'm working from doesn't show the brand, and was taken after it stopped selling gas.   I'll probably make it a Texaco, but I've drawn up decals for other brands.  Shell might be nice, too.   

Dave


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: chester on October 15, 2010, 06:48:15 PM
Interesting technique that seems to work well Dave. Nice results. If you're looking for what others do, I have used a product called Durabond used in drywall finishing. It is a powder that comes in different setting times. (i.e. Durabond 90 takes 90 mins. to cure) It is a lot harder than premixed drywall compound yet easily sanded.


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: Ray Dunakin on October 15, 2010, 07:17:26 PM
Very nice, a good subtle effect!

BTW, does anyone know if that water putty holds up outdoors?



Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: eTraxx on October 15, 2010, 08:05:23 PM
It's a gypsum-based filler. The product page says .. "DURHAM'S Putty will withstand weather if kept painted, but paint will peel from damp Water Putty."  .. which I take to mean .. no. You could prob find something at Lowes .. one of the cement products that might work for outside


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: finescalerr on October 16, 2010, 02:15:21 AM
As you were describing the technique, Dave, I was thinking, "Why not spray a coat from too far away?" And then, in the next photo, you described exactly that. HO is a tricky scale for achieving subtle effects and you once again have managed it well. -- Russ


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: Malachi Constant on October 16, 2010, 03:42:10 AM
Nice mix of techniques to get the subtle texture in the small scale!

Cheers,
Dallas


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: DaKra on October 16, 2010, 06:37:57 AM
On the waterproofing, I'd figure if you use Durhams as an additive to a weather proof paint, like an enamel, it won't absorb moisture and cause problems.   I think the stuff that Chester mentioned would work, too, maybe better.   In this case, the material only needs to fill the basic function of a filler to thicken and roughen the paint.   

Durham's is great for a lot of things.  I first heard of it in FineScale Modeler's series on boxed dioramas by Ray Anderson.  He used it very effectively for rocks, masonry, etc.   The series of articles was reprinted in a booklet 

http://www.amazon.com/Art-Diorama-Ray-Anderson/dp/0890240922

Dave


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: DaKra on October 16, 2010, 04:45:29 PM
Now that I have the texture, I need to apply the finish.   I like to brush paint acrylics because I can use thin layers of paint to get nice, natural looking tone variations.   

White acrylic is often problematic because it doesn't have good coverage unless its thick.  But thinning it down makes it easy to lift a previous coat with the next one.   So I was careful to let each layer dry in between, and apply the next layer fast and light.  I stopped at three coats.  Didn't want to obliterate the stucco texture.   

That was followed up by a coat of Future, clear acrylic so that I'd have a good surface for an oil wash. 


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: DaKra on October 16, 2010, 04:53:20 PM
Next step was an oil wash to add some grime and also enhance the texture and the shadows under the trim work.   Have to be really careful with effects like this or it starts to look unnatural.     It will be placed in a city environment so I can justify a lot of grime but still, can't overdo!   

I used highly thinned out W&N Paynes Grey based on the experiment I documented in the other thread.  This pigment is very finely ground so it doesn't clump.  I neutralized the blue tint with a speck of burnt umber.     The Future coat helped it flow and kept it from staining the white paint.

I guess I could have used an airbrush and an undercoat, the way the model aircraft guys enhance their panel lines.  Probably faster and simpler.     

That's all for now.  Next I will dry brush a little white here and there to reduce the grey cast added by the wash.  Dry brushing is another of those areas where less is more, or it will start to look phony!   


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: Ray Dunakin on October 16, 2010, 06:54:35 PM
I think the grime effect looks great! Again, a good subtle effect.


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: JohnP on October 16, 2010, 09:15:02 PM
Bravo Dave. Simple technique with common materials, no need to look too hard or import some exotic stuff. It is all in the hands of the modeler. But it can be practiced endlessly on any scrap before applying it to the final model. I wish we could see more stuff like this.

I want to see it in context with other colors, materials, objects and finishes.

John


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: DaKra on October 24, 2010, 06:00:01 PM
Structure is done, just needs some concrete stoops before its dropped into its diorama.   Decided not to dry brush it, looked OK and didn't want to risk a "cake frosting" effect. 

(http://i655.photobucket.com/albums/uu276/DaveKrakow/Station1.jpg)

 


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: JohnP on October 24, 2010, 06:53:24 PM
Very nice to see Dave. Believable without being over the top. It will blend into the diorama well. The lettering and sign look great. It worked out very well.

So now I have to see it in the diorama. ;D

John


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: eTraxx on October 24, 2010, 07:28:31 PM
Dang that looks good.


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: Malachi Constant on October 24, 2010, 09:10:43 PM
Dave --

Once again, quite impressive ... especially with the very subtle discolorations under the overhangs, etc.  Some really exquisite work you've got going here.

Cheers,
Dallas


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: Ray Dunakin on October 24, 2010, 10:36:25 PM
That looks fantastic!



Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: BKLN on October 25, 2010, 07:11:48 AM
Dave,
I know how long you have been playing around with this project, so I am happy to see this thing becoming reality. This simple, yet beautiful structure will provide a great stage for the other details like the gas pumps. Very nice!


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: DaKra on October 25, 2010, 07:18:52 AM
Thanks guys.   Ya know, the more I look at it, the more I'm convinced the original was a Shell station!   Now I must resist the urge to start over!   :-\     

Dave


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: MinerFortyNiner on October 26, 2010, 11:42:20 PM
Very nice execution of a subtle texture, stucco is tricky to replicate, especially in smaller scales.  I really like the structure, whether or not there's an 'inner Shell' in there!

What is the structure's origin, did you have it cut or do it yourself, or is it a kit?  I am curious, because its general architecture and size would work in O scale on my layout.


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: DaKra on October 27, 2010, 07:08:14 AM
Yes, stucco looks very simple but it can be difficult if its rushed into without a proven method.  I spent a frustrating day last year mucking around with gesso and plaster and whatnot.  I plan to try this in 1/35 next year, probably will only need the paint and Durham's mix, without sanding and spray paint to reduce it to something more appropriate for 1/87. 

The basis for the structure is a photo I found in a book, reconstructed a set of plans for it in Adobe, based on typical measurements (e.g. door width and height) backdated the windows to something more typical of the era, etc.   Broke the diagram down into kit parts, and laser cut those myself.   I have a modern Taco stand version of this in the works.     

Dave
             

 


Title: Re: Stucco Texture in HO
Post by: DaKra on December 01, 2011, 11:58:07 AM
Just a little followup on this. The prototype model has been made into a limited edition VectorCut kit, as a Shell station.    As it turned out, the .02" material I use for the kit's exterior walls has a perfect HO scale stucco texture to it, so nothing is needed except a brush coat of white paint.    In future if I need a fine stucco texture, this will be my first choice over anything hand applied.    

(http://i655.photobucket.com/albums/uu276/DaveKrakow/VCGasStationS2.jpg)

Dave